Category Archives: Book Reviews

Review of Fire and Frost

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Amazon

Blurb:

Crystal Frost has spent her whole life believing she’s ordinary, and her mother has long held the secret of her heritage. When Crystal begins seeing the ghost of a dead classmate, her life spirals out of control. She’s faced with the threat that everyone will find out she’s a freak, as if the struggle to figure out her new-found abilities wasn’t enough pressure. Crystal has to find some way to save the people who have come to her for help all while trying to keep her abilities a secret. Will she be able to fulfill these overwhelming demands while solving the mystery that is the ghost of Olivia Owen?

My Review:

Five Stars

Fire and Frost by Alicia Rades was an amazing read that left you on the edge of your seat. I found it very hard to put this book down, and actually read it in two days because I couldn’t put it down. And I think because the characters are so well crafted that that makes it so much easier for the reader to fall in love with the read quicker.
Crystal is your average teenager, or so she thinks and then her life takes a turn she didn’t expect when she starts seeing the ghost of a girl that passed away a year ago. Eventually she learns that she has abilities she didn’t know she had and that her mom does too. And she goes on this journey to learn more about who she is and strengthen her abilities with the help of her best friend and mom. But she also has to help the ghost of her classmate, and her classmate that is blackmailing her because she knows her secret.
We follow Crystal as she pieces the puzzle together and figures it all out. And in the end she helps everyone that needed her help. And she learns something about herself along the way, which is always really cool when that happens to characters in a novel.
I became quite fond of Crystal and enjoyed seeing her grow as a character and into her abilities. I knew she had it in her from the start, and am glad to see the story end as successfully as it did with her resolving the issue. However, it left me on a cliffhanger and now I’m dying to read the next one because I really want to know what happens to the little girl.

Review of Love Tink

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Amazon

Blurb:

Enchanted meets Peter Pan in LOVE, TINK

This is a novella– the first of six episodes.

Tink is hopelessly smitten with Peter, the leader of the Lost Boys who’d mysteriously arrived at Neverland two years ago. Unfortunately, Peter is tired of the adventure and especially tired of dodging Captain Hook who is after his head. He just wants to go back to New York City and live his life as a normal fifteen year old

Tink is the only one who can help Peter return, but it breaks her heart to do it. She just wants to make him happy, so she does the unthinkable and betrays the fairy king. Now her heart is filled with remorse. Should she go after Peter? Should she follow him to his New York?

My Review:

Five Stars

Love Tink was a wonderful retelling of Peter Pan that really made you think. It is always hinted that in Peter Pan that Tink has feelings for Peter, but Tink never acts upon those feelings. However, in this retelling, Tink tries to react upon her feelings. She tries to tell Peter that she loves him, but ends up finding out that he is unhappy in Neverland. Though Tink doesn’t understand why Peter is unhappy in Neverland and doesn’t want to help him leave she eventually succumbs to doing the right thing. Which is what love really boils down to in the end, sacrificing things for the person that you love.
As in the original telling of Peter Pan, Hook is the bad guy. And he’s out for Peter Pan as always. But he doesn’t appear to be as menacing as in the original telling of Peter Pan, which I suspect might change as the story progresses.
Elle Strauss creates such a magical picture of Neverland that makes you wish the green lights would whisk you into Neverland so you could frolic with Tink and the other Neverland fairies. And I can’t wait to read the next episode to see what happens, because I’m rather curious what Tink’s mischief gets her into.

Review of Spectral Tales

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Amazon

Blurb:

Whether they are spirits of the departed or figments of an overactive imagination, ghosts are a staple in fiction. Storytellers have portrayed ghosts as scary, friendly, or annoying across many genres. Now, eight authors offer their own interpretations of ghosts through a collection of short stories that will appeal to fans of horror, fantasy, or young adult fiction.

My Review:

Five Stars

Spectral Tales featured a lot of enticing stories that left you craving the next ghostly tale. And each tale was different than the next, and left you not knowing what to really expect. Actually, I didn’t know what to expect at all from most of the stories because I went in thinking most of the stories would revolve solely around ghosts, and though most had elements of ghosts the stories didn’t solely focus on that. And even than the stories didn’t deal solely on the dead haunting the living either. Some stories dealt with the dead being trapped in their own bodies, trying to figure out what happened, some stories featured those trying to find lost parents.
But I’d have to say out of all seven stories in this collection my favorite was Farwell Ohana. This tale was just so different and put a spin on the supernatural that I’d never thought of before. Without giving too much of this amazing story away, I’ll just say that the characters in this tale, have powers that outcast them from society. They break free from their bonds and one of them wishes to speak to her deceased parents by speaking with the Night Marchers. And this is where the part that I never thought of occurs, the Night Marchers are awesome supernatural beings that I don’t want to say what they actually do because I don’t want to give away too much of the story- so I highly recommend everyone going to read it to find out what I’m talking about.
I’m a big supernatural buff and quite enjoy reading books that revolve around the supernatural realm, and oftentimes a lot of the stories seem so farfetched that you can’t get wrapped up in them. I didn’t have that issue with any of the stories in this collection. I was swopped into them quickly and they all held some actual realism as to what happens with paranormal activity. And rather than this realism feeling fake and pushed it felt wholesome, and for the goosebumps I’m grateful. And I look forward to reading more tantalizing tales from these brilliant writers in the future, because they all have such a way with words.

Review of Please Don’t Tell my Parents I’m a Supervillain

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Amazon

Blurb:

Penelope Akk wants to be a superhero. She’s got superhero parents. She’s got the ultimate mad science power, filling her life with crazy gadgets even she doesn’t understand. She has two super-powered best friends. In middle school, the line between good and evil looks clear.

In real life, nothing is that clear. All it takes is one hero’s sidekick picking a fight, and Penny and her friends are labeled supervillains. In the process, Penny learns a hard lesson about villainy: She’s good at it.

Criminal masterminds, heroes in power armor, bottles of dragon blood, alien war drones, shapeshifters and ghosts, no matter what the super powered world throws at her, Penny and her friends come out on top. They have to. If she can keep winning, maybe she can clear her name before her mom and dad find out.

My Review:

Five Stars

Please don’t tell my parents I’m a Super Villain by Richard Roberts was a lot more comical than I originally pinned it to be. And I absolutely loved that about this book. There was the right balance of action and comedic relief that you almost forgot it was thirteen year old kids you were reading about. You forgot that it was children who were outsmarting adult super villains and giving them a run-for-their-money. The villain community and hero community had no idea what hit them when the Inscrutable Machine surfaced, and to be honest I don’t think the Inscrutable Machine did either- at first.
In the beginning we watch as Penny yearns to get her super powers, and what kid wouldn’t want to have their super powers. But the real kicker is that in the world that Roberts created the kids grow into their powers and don’t get them until they are a certain age. So in a weird way it sort of works like puberty, and that’s a horrible analogy, but it’s actually rather accurate. Because from what I’ve gathered from reading this novel is that most heroes started gaining their super powers in their teen years, and had unlocked their full potential around their early twenties. So they go through a super power puberty, so to speak.
Penny gets a flash of her abilities and she’s super excited, but than her parents crush her with the news of super hero puberty and that she may not see her full potential for a few more years. Well she isn’t satisfied with this answer, and I’m quite glad for that. Because if she was satisfied with that answer the story wouldn’t have went in the direction that it did and Penny wouldn’t have unlocked her potential as early as she did. Though she may have ended up on the right side of the playing field too.
Through most of the book I was hoping the Inscrutable Machine could turn good and be the super heroes that Penny so desperately wants to be, but I think the group is too good at being bad. And in all honesty, I’d hate to see them turn good. It’s just to fun to watch this group be mischievous and outsmart the adults. They are just too good at it. Which is what makes the book so enjoyable. These kids are brilliant and work so well together, they are like a well-oiled clock that works perfectly and nothing can break its sync. Even when they are faced with trials they don’t know how to face they come out on top, which proves their friendship and wit.
I can’t wait to continue reading more of Penny and her friend’s journey and hope that they stay on the wrong side of things. We have enough good guys to look up to, it’s time for some fun villains for a change.

Review of Death in Neverland

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Amazon

Blurb:

In the Neverland, people don’t grow up. Because they’re dead.

Remy Cutler dies, and somehow escapes certain death. She returns to the land of the living with nothing but a ripped gown and a fear of heights.

Two years later, she plans to escape her arranged marriage by stowing away onto a ship in hopes to leave her home with no one knowing. However, she is found out, and the sailors aren’t happy. Before any damage can be done, she is yanked from her predicament back to The Neverland, a place where death resides – the very place she escaped from years ago. Souls are ferried by her savior. To her, he’s known as Nick, but to The Neverland, he’s the slippery Nicholas Grey.

The more time Remy spends with Nick and his crew, however, the more she realizes he’s shockingly misunderstood. Pirates aren’t all bad the way gentlemen aren’t all good. One such gentleman goes by the name of Peter, and he has nothing but power on his mind and revenge against Grey in his heart. And then there are those that are completely indiscernible, like James Hook, a Viking and ruler of The Other World, whose sole ambition is attaining more souls to rule over, no matter what the cost.

This dark retelling of Peter Pan infuses familiar characters created by J. M. Barrie with new characters and Greek mythology. It is the first in a trilogy.

My Review:

Five Stars

Death in Neverland by Heather Myers follows Remy as her world turns upside down. One minute she’s a respectable lady the next she’s on a pirate ship in Neverland. One minute she’s betrothed to marry a man she does not love, the next she’s on a ship washing dishes as her whole outlook on life slowly changes. But things are not as they appear to be.
At first you assume the ship’s captain to be either Hook or Peter Pan, after all it’s a book about Neverland. And one would also think that Remy would be Wendy, but she isn’t. But that isn’t the case at all because the ship Remy finds herself on is captained by Nick.
As the story unfolds we find out that Remy has been there before, as she’s faced death and escaped. She’s the only one to escape deaths clutches and this has act has caught the eye of Nick and the magistrate and Nick is told to keep an eye on Remy. He does so and ends up saving her, which is how she ends up on the ship in the first place. Here you meet his crew, which at first seem like your average pirate crew, but then you learn more about them and grow to love each character and actually wish they weren’t in the situation that they are in.
Then there’s Hook. Now one of my favorite characters in the original tellings of Peter Pan is Hook. I don’t know why but I really like Hook, and that goes the same for Death in Neverland. He’s created to be a handsome, yet deadly character and he knows it. He’ll do what he can to get what he wants. And he just makes you quake at the knees when you read him. He really fits the original Hook persona and I think that is amazing. Pan on the other hand doesn’t really fit his persona in this tale. In the original Pan was a good guy, here Pan is far from good. And he’s not adventurous and fun-loving, he’s power hungry.
But as the story progresses you see that something slowly builds between Remy and Nick. Though I can’t say for certain what that is. Could just be a captain and crew bond, or it could be more than that. But what Remy does in the end makes me think it’s so much more because she makes a sacrifice that most wouldn’t do for someone they consider to be their boss.
And I’ll say I’m not satisfied with how it ended. I wanted it to end with Remy running into the arms of Nick and kissing him, but that doesn’t happen. I wanted them to confess a love for one another and sail away in the end to find Pan and end his reign of terror.
But there’s still more to the trilogy so it could still happen and I have hope that Remy and Nick will have their happily Neverland after.

Review of Musings from Wunderland

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Amazon

Blurb:

Like a leaf on the wind
My words fly from my heart
Spiraling
Twisting
Landing
Melting upon page
Creating miniature works
of art

My Review:

Five Stars

E.H. Demeter has such a way with words and painting breathtaking pictures. Each poem and short left me yearning for the next emotion packed piece, which is truly amazing. Demeter is such a talented author and I love everything I’ve read of hers, and can’t wait to read more of her brilliant works.

Review of Steampunk Fairy Tales

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Amazon

Blurb:

A toyshop owner builds a set of magic clockwork dolls that delight a factory town. A three-inch tall samurai faces a giant iron ogre with only a sewing needle and a coin. A scientist seeks an antidote to his formula gone wrong, with the help of his partner’s beautiful daughter.

All of these stories and more are included in Steampunk Fairy Tales. Written by authors from three different continents, every enchanting tale combines the futuristic Victorian concept of steam and fashion with memorable stories, from the recognizable “Jack and the Beanstalk”, to other popular and unfamiliar works from Germany, France, Italy and Japan.

With steam driven gadgets such as mechanical goggles, hoverboards, and an orchestra of automatons. Steampunk Fairy Tales is a charming and unique collection of works for current lovers of the genre, and those just diving in.

My Review:

Five Stars

I love steampunk and was excited when I found this amazing collection. And the collection held up to being amazing and exactly what I wanted.

Each tale was wonderfully done and left you craving the next. And I absolutely love how at the end each writer described what story there study was derived from because some I wasn’t sure if as I was reading through. I think them telling this at the end was a brilliant idea and I’m glad they did because it allowed the readers to learn about stories they may not have previously known.

I’d say my favorite in this collection is the first story about the toy maker and his magical dolls. The story reminded me a lot of one of my favorite movies, Mr. Moratorium’s Wonder Emporium.